Plenty to criticize, plenty to celebrate

–Jared Milne– Recently there have been harsh criticisms levied against past–and often celebrated–figures in Canadian history, particularly Prime Ministers like John A. Macdonald and Wilfrid Laurier. Critics have pointed out the way past historians often ignored or downplayed the negative aspects of their legacies, such as the “head tax” on Chinese immigrants, the discrimination against…

What is the right amount of tax?

–Jared Milne- Tax time has come and gone again in Canada, which can remind us of politicians’ comments on taxes. Many politicians, especially conservative ones, have talked about tax relief, offering all kinds of tax cuts and rebates for everything from fitness to children’s art programs. Oftentimes, they also guarantee that these tax cuts can…

Hopeful signs for pipelines

–Jared Milne- At first glance, pipelines to get Alberta’s oil to market seem stalled. Many people across Canada don’t think the advantages of pipelines are worth the environmental risks they’re worried about. As I’ve pointed out before, Stephen Harper deserves a lot of the blame for opposition to pipelines becoming as strong as it has.…

Renaming will not lead to reconciliation

-Jared Milne- This article was submitted to The Tête-à-Tête as part of a Discussion on inclusivity, free speech, and identity politics. Several years ago, the St. Albert Gazette ran a letter from a resident who said that the statue of Father Albert Lacombe erected outside the St. Albert Catholic Parish Church should be taken down. He argued…

Culture Wars: appropriation vs. inclusion, and why it matters

–Niya Bajaj- This article is part of a Discussion on inclusivity, free speech, and identity politics. In The Closing of the American Mind Allan Bloom argued “Cultures fight wars with one another…Cultures have different perceptions, which determine what the world is. They cannot come to terms…The very idea of culture carries with it a value: man needs…

Discussion: Inclusivity, free speech, and identity politics

In light of recent incidents at Yale (see competing perspectives here and here) and University of Missouri and in the context of the broader ongoing dialogue on how to balance sensitivity, inclusivity and free speech concerns (e.g. Charlie Hebdo and censored campus speakers), and on the intersections between social justice and identity politics (e.g. affirmative action, balancing…